Scouts is for girls and boys aged between 11 to  15 years

At this point in their lives, Scouts show great enthusiasm for challenging activities that give them a sense of achievement and allow them to follow their special interests with intensity. Trained Leaders use these characteristics to help provide Scouting Activities such as:

It also gives them the greatest opportunity of all - the opportunity to develop real friendships by sharing the experiences of learning, growing and exploring the world with others. Our Scouts aren't told what to do by adults. Our Scout Leaders are there to help our Scouts plan activities,  make decisions with their Patrols, and give them direction in learning the Scouting Fundamentals and teach Campcraft Skills and Adventurous Activities like hiking, sailing, canoeing and navigation.

 

In Scouting, we learn by doing.

It is learning through ACTION that makes it so fun. Imagine exploring our vast bushlands, helping in emergency rescues, operating a radio station or LAN party, canoeing down a swift river, camping out in the bush, sharing a campfire meal or sailing across the ocean with the salt spray in your face. 

 

The Patrol System

The Patrol System is the basis of the Scout Section and the principal means by which young people are trained to become responsible citizens. Baden-Powell, the Founder of Scouting, recognised that young people delight at forming themselves into small groups each under its own leader whether for work, fun or mischief. He made use of this natural organisation and called it the Patrol System.

 

In consultation with the Leaders, Troop Council and Scouts A Patrol Leader (PL) and Assistant Patrol Leaders is appointed as the head of each Patrol and is responsible for the training and development of the Patrol, setting and achievement of goals, fostering the group life of the Patrol, and the well- being and advancement of the Patrol to name but a few. The Assistant Patrol Leader supports the Patrol Leader and takes the place of the Patrol Leader when they are absent and otherwise assists in running the Patrol.

 

At 1st Woy Woy, we have Seven Patrols (7). they are:

  1. The Lyrebird Patrol

  2. The Seal Patrol

  3. The Kingfisher Patrol

  4. The Sea Gull Patrol

  5. The Shark Patrol

  6. The Eagle Patrol

  7. The Wombat Patrol

***A word about the Wombat Patrol

We created the Wombat Patrol, for all those Scouts who regularly miss section nights. It was decided at Troop Council that any Scout who misses more than 3 section nights in a row, or 4 section nights in a term without good reason will be reassigned to the Wombat Patrol. The Wombat Patrol is for those regular "no-shows" who undermine their Patrols through non-attendance and picking and choosing what they want and don't want to do. Scouts who don't turn up to section nights put enormous pressure on the Scout Patrols on Camps and other events because they have missed out on the training held at section nights, have not partciapted in the Team Building Activities, or the planning of Patrol Activities with their Patrol.

 

The Value of the Patrol System is that it provides: 

  • Opportunities for leadership experience for the Patrol Leader;

  • Opportunities for the Patrol members to gain leadership training through observation of the Patrol Leader and by accepting responsibilities within the Patrol; 

  • The opportunity to belong to and work in an autonomous group within the overall structure of the Troop; 

  • A secure environment in which members can test their physical, social and mental abilities;

  • Opportunities for practising and expressing concern for others;

  • The opportunity to manage and administer Patrol property, finance and other resources; 

     

The Troop

At 1st Woy Woy, our seven Patrols make up our Scout Troop. A Troop is composed of approximately six Patrols and should not contain more than 36 Scouts. An experienced Scout who has undergone Leadership Training and has progressed beyond their Pioneer Level, can become a Troop Leader, and Troop Council refers to the Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader of each Patrol who regularly come together to discuss the direction of the troop, Badge work and planning, issues within their Patrols and to plan activities.

 

Scouts In Action

In Scouting, we learn by doing. It is learning through ACTION. Imagine exploring a mountain wilderness, soaring on warm air currents high above the earth at the controls of a glider plane, helping in emergency rescues, operating a radio station, photographing wild animals, sending coded messages, searching for gold, canoeing down a swift river, camping out bush, recording your own songs or sailing across the ocean with the salt spray in your face.

Scouting gives our members the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of exciting activities. It also gives them the greatest opportunity of all - the opportunity to develop real friendships by sharing the experiences of learning, growing and exploring the world with others. Our Scouts aren't told what to do by adults. Our Scout Leaders are there to help our Scouts plan activities,  make decisions with their Patrols, and give them direction in learning the Scouting Fundamentals and teach Campcraft Skills and Adventurous Activities like hiking, sailing, canoeing and navigation.

 

Leading In Action

As our Scouts learn and gain experience, they’ll discover not only more about the world around them and the adventures they can have, but more about working together and becoming a leader too. Under the guidance of our Scout Leader our Scouts can move up through the ranks to accept the challenge and adventures of leadership.

 

Patrols In Action

Our Scouts become a member of a Scout Patrol. They learn to work as a team, helping each other, depending on each other and each having a say in decision making. Their Patrols will have from four to eight members, and be led by a Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader. The Patrol Leader organises our meetings and takes part in Troop Council meetings with other Patrol Leaders.

Troops In Action

Several Scout Patrols make up a Scout Troop. The Troop usually meets in a Scout Hall and is guided by a Scout Leader. Broad program planning, Troop management and routine business is handled by the Troop Council, which is made up of all Patrol Leaders and the Scout Leader. 

 

The Scout Promise

On my honour

I promise that I will do my best

To do my duty to my God, and

To Australia

To help other people, and

To the live by the Scout Law 

 

 

 

 
  • Sailing

  • Abseiling

  • Camp cooking

  • Construction

  • Camp fire

  • Camping

  • Hiking

  • Caving

  • Environmental Projects

  • International Events

 

  • Canoing

  • Games

  • Gangshow (Theatre)

  • Survival

  • Map and Compass

  • Knots and Lashings

  • Rock Climbing

  • Sailing

  • Patrol Activities

  • Jamborees

  • Scuba diving

  • Skiing

  • Team Activities

  • Expeditions

  • Community Service

  • Craft

  • First aid

  • Flying

  • Power Boating

  • Region Rallies

The Scout Law

A Scout is trustworthy

A Scout is loyal

A Scout is helpful

A Scout is friendly

A Scout is cheerful

A Scout is considerate

A Scout is thrifty

A Scout is courageous

A Scout is respectful

A Scout cares for the environment

A great video on how the Patrol System works.

 

Scoutcraft Badge

This is usually the first badge to be gained and awarded in the Scout Section. The training and testing is carried out jointly by the Patrol Leader and Scout Leader. 

 

Target Badges

There are three levels of Target badges. To achieve the Pioneer, Explorer or Adventurer Badge, the Scout must complete the two compulsory Campcraft and Citizenship Target badges, plus one of the six elective Pioneer Target badges at each level.

  • The Pioneer Badge (Red) concentrates on participation and learning.

  • The Explorer Badge (Blue) concentrates on knowledge and skill.

  • The Adventurer Badge (Green) concentrates on instructing others.

 

Proficiency Badges

The aim of the Proficiency Badge system is to allow the Scout to develop in a challenging and interesting pursuit. To achieve a Proficiency Badge the Scout must fulfil requirements set in conjunction with their Adviser and which include the three elements of demonstrate/investigate, skill and an activity. There are 31 Scout Proficiency Badges

 

Special Interest Badges

There are nine other badges that may be worn. The following five may be used as Proficiency Badges: Amateur Radio Operator Badge, Anchor Badge, Deaf Sign Language Badge, Faith Awareness Badge, Language Emblem. The following three may be used as Target Badges: First Aid Badge, Landcare Badge, World Scout Environment Badge.Their Service Our Heritage Badge is a participation badge which may be worn by both adult and youth Members.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Patrol Activity Badges

A Scout is required to earn one Patrol Activity Badge for each of the Target levels in order to earn their Cord for each level. Patrols decide on their own activity to be undertaken as a group. The Troop Council sets the standards for the activity and decides when the Patrol Activity has been achieved.

 

Cords
  • To earn the Pioneer Cord (Red) the Scout must complete the Pioneer Badge, two Proficiency Badges and one Patrol Activity Badge.

  • To earn the Explorer Cord (Blue) the Scout must complete the Explorer Badge, two Proficiency Badges (making a total of four Proficiency Badges), and one Patrol Activity Badge (making a total of two Patrol Activity Badges).

  • To earn the Adventurer Cord (Green) the Scout must complete the Adventurer Badge, two Proficiency Badges (making a total of six Proficiency Badges), and one Patrol Activity Badge (making a total of three Patrol Activity Badges).

 

Scout Leadership Course

The Scout Leadership Course aims to provide suitable leadership skills for Scouts, utilising a practical "hands on" approach. This course is organised and run in line with the Patrol System, and can be undertaken on completion of the Pioneer Badge.

 

Leadership Activity

This requires a Scout to show significant personal development while demonstrating an active leadership role. This involves the planning and organisation of an activity or event that covers a minimum of one full day or overnight.

 

Australian Scout Medallion

The Australian Scout Medallion is the highest award in the Scout Section. It is considered the pinnacle of Scouting at this stage. To earn the Australian Scout Medallion a Scout must:

  • Participate in a Scout Leadership Course at any time after completion of the Pioneer Badge;

  • Demonstrate an active leadership role in Scouting;

  • Achieve the Adventurer Cord.

 

Venturer Link Badge

The Venturer Scout Link Badge links Scouts to the Venturer Scout Section and is the next step in the Scouting journey.

 

Duke of Edinburgh Award

(Bronze) Is available to any Scout at our Group over the age of 14 who is linking up to Venturers.

 

 

Scouts Award Scheme

The Scout Award Scheme provides the main focus for Patrol and Troop activities and gives suitable recognition to Scouts for achievement. Following a Scout's Investiture, they complete the Scoutcraft Badge and then may earn Targets to become a Pioneer, Explorer and Adventurer Scout. Target requirements provide for going places and doing the adventurous, appealing things that Scouts enjoy, including camping, hiking, exploring, swimming, boating, track and field, fitness activities, and environment projects and practices, usually in the company of the Patrol or other Scouts.

Joeys meet Mondays 5-6pm

Cubs meet Mondays 6-7:30pm

Scouts meet Tuesdays 6:30-8:30pm

Venturers meet Wednesdays 7-9pm

 

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Find us at

2 North Burge Rd

Woy Woy NSW 2256

Just opposite Lions Park

& the Boat Ramp.

admin@woywoyseascouts.com.au

Cords